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Proven quality and production

June 18, 2020

Justin Patrick

By Justin Patrick

Trophy Technology Pro Staff share their inside tips, tricks, and advice.

The way I see it in this industry, short of creating something that’s completely in its own category, companies can take two approaches in product development. Take an already existing idea and add their own unique twist to it or take an already existing idea and establish a reputation of quality.

Neither route is better than the other and, in many cases, we see success when both approaches are achieved and coupled with a strong marketing plan and proven effectiveness.

One category of products that doesn’t leave very much room for ingenuity is hooks. A hook is a hook, right? From the naked eye, different brands of hooks may look the same but it’s the tiny details put into production that can make all the difference. Here’s why Kitana Hooks have come to be my go-to choice amongst others.

Proven Quality Production

Right off the top Kitana Hooks are made utilizing a chemical sharpening process. Now that’s not necessarily a field in my realm of expertise, but from my understanding, this process produces a superior product in both strength and maintained sharpness when done correctly. If you would like to read more about the details, I suggest this article. It enlightened me on how it works.

Kitana Hooks come in an array of options for all your technique-specific needs. Sizes are also plentiful to choose from as well as different gauged wire. Meaning you have standard wire and heavier-duty wired options for those times when you’re around big fish.

The treble hooks have particularly grabbed my attention since I do love fishing a crankbait. I can drag a worm all day and won’t necessarily worry too much about dulling an offset worm hook, but when you’re cranking pea gravel or chunk rock it’s vital to have quality hooks that won’t dull quickly.
For tournament anglers’ dull hooks could result in losing fish when it matters the most. Not something a competitor really wants to gamble with. They need everything working for them not against them.

“THESE HOOKS DON’T LET GO”

Coupled with razor-sharp points, the tips are curved inwards slightly. What this generates is a “locking in” effect. It’s going to grab that fish and help keep it pinned. They really do take a beating and maintain their sharpness too. I have gone all day and not had to change my hooks once. For my pocket book that’s a plus.

Kitana Treble Hook

I really want to emphasize just how sharp these hooks are. Truthfully, I’m overly cautious and a little nervous when I’m changing out trebles on my crankbaits using this brand. Which hasn’t really been the case before.

I gauge when I need to change out my hooks by slightly rubbing the hooks over the inside of my hand. If the hooks catch my skin and don’t want to let go, they are good, if they pull loose easily or don’t catch at all, I change them. THESE HOOKS DON’T LET GO. They almost seem too sharp. Not a bad problem to have if you ask me.

What I’m trying to do is somewhat replicate a fish swatting at my bait and its mouth or skin barely hitting my hooks. I want those hooks to snag the fish. This isn’t a sport of freebies. Will I ever lose a fish on these hooks? Probably, just because it is prone to happen on any bait and with any hooks. Honestly, though, I haven’t experienced that yet.

Kitana Series Hooks

Once you determine how sharp a hook is you want to know if it bends out on you easily or if it’s brittle enough to break. My most recent trip out I was throwing a lipless crankbait on 17lb Seaguar AbrazX. I was using number 6 Kitana trebles and as it goes with fishing I got hung on a log. I was only in 4 foot of water and clear, so I could see my bait down there. It wasn’t wrapped around the log just stuck to it. After yanking on it and finally just pulling to try and break it loose my line gave out before the hooks bent or broke. Now, I’m not claiming that’s the best way to test durability. But it does give me confidence that a 6 pounder is not going to bend out my hooks when it takes a sudden dive at the boat.

As a tournament angler who depends on my gear performing, I have the ultimate confidence that these hooks are going to get the job done, every time. Add some to your arsenal. You won’t be disappointed. Get outdoors, get on the water, and most importantly have fun!

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